A New Approach to Steak and Another Birthday!!

Happy Birthday!!
Happy Birthday!!

     I can’t believe that Griffin’s Grub is turning two years old! I am soooo excited! Technically, it’s not till tomorrow (Aug 31st), but I’ve got too much to do this weekend to do a post on a Saturday. Anyway, what better way to celebrate a birthday than with steak?

Herb Paintbrush
“The herb brush flavors the baste, releases oils into the crust as it builds, and eventually becomes a garnish for the Board Dressing”

     There has been a lot of talk on the Egghead Forum lately about Adam Perry Lang and the second release of his book “Serious Barbecue”. Apparently, the first edition went out of print some time ago and copies were going for hundreds of dollars. No way could I afford that, but now with the second release going for around $27 on Amazon, I’m sure I’ll be picking up a copy soon. Before buying the book, I thought I would try out one of his recipes that I could find online to see what I thought.

Butter Baste
Butter Baste

        Before cooking the steak, Adam makes a Butter Baste that he brushes on the steaks while he cooks them to further develop flavors. The heat from the steak causes oils to be released from the herb brush adding more flavor to the steak as well as the butter baste as the steak continues to cook.

Steak on the BGE at 475ish
Steak on the BGE at 475ish

     Of all the recipes I could find online, none really specify a temperature at which to cook the steaks. This recipe only called for the fire to be “very hot” and “mature and level”. Ok…so what’s very hot? 450? 500? 700? My Egg settled in at 475ish, which might have been fine had I not left the steak on as long as I did or had I not cooked it on a raised grate. Live and learn.

Board Dressing
Board Dressing

     One of the more unusual techniques Mr. Lang employs is to build a Board Dressing using extra olive oil, parsley, salt and the tips of the herb brush. Just mix it up right there on the board. Kind of reminds me of something Steve Raichlen did in what I think was his Tuscan Steak in How To Grill. I might be wrong on that, so don’t quote me. Other than Adam and Steve, I don’t recall seeing or hearing of anybody else doing anything similar.

Sliced
Sliced

     Once the steak is done, drop it right down on the Board Dressing and flip it to coat. Allow five minutes for the steak to rest and begin cutting, turning each slice in the dressing to coat. Plate up and pour the remaining board dressing over the steaks and finish with a sprinkling of salt.

     There are a couple of reasons I didn’t write this post like normal. For starters, I feel like I made quite a few “rookie” mistakes while re-creating this recipe and those would not allow me to make an accurate assessment. While making his steak seasoning, I realized I didn’t have garlic salt. Only garlic powder. OK…garlic powder was what I had, that’s what I used. Not sure how that affected it. Two, after making the butter baste, it called for letting it stand for one hour to bring out the flavors. Whoops…with my ADD I must have missed that part. I made it right before grilling the steaks. Would that have a huge impact? I’m not sure, but it was too late to do anything about it. And three, I didn’t do a good job cooking my steak. In fact, I overcooked it. I tried to do a reverse sear and I wasn’t sure on my times and temps. I should have just stuck with my normal method.

     I will say that the flavors were spot on amazing and I can’t wait to try it again. There was a really nice herbal flavor to the steak that was just out of this world. Usually, I’m pretty much a purist when it comes to steak. Salt and pepper only and let the steak speak for itself, but this was a nice change and one I can’t wait to try again. I’ll work on my technique and when I get it down, I’ll make sure to post up ingredients and directions. If you can’t wait till then, look up Adam Perry Lang and steak recipes or use This One.

Two years old!!
Two years old!!

     But really, this post isn’t about the steak. It’s about Griffin’s Grub turning two years old!! Still going strong and getting better and better as time goes by. At least, I like to think so. I hope you agree.

     There are some things I would like to try and tackle in the upcoming year. We’ve never done lamb before. I would like to try a few things with that. Maybe goat as well. I recently saw somebody cook a 10lb suckling pig on their BGE. That seemed really cool to me, if I can just find one. Maybe try my hand at more baking and bread making. Been saying that I would like to make my own hamburger buns for a while. Those are just a few of the things I would like to try.

     I said it last year and I’m going to say it again this year, “What would you like to see? Got any ideas of things you’d like to see me grill or barbecue? Or heck….maybe even try to cook on that oversized box in the kitchen? Or is there anything you’d like to see me change? As always, I’d love to hear from you, so leave a comment.” 

     Anyway, thanks for making our second year such a huge success (in my mind at least). I appreciate each and every one of you that stops by and I hope that I have helped you in some small way. I couldn’t do this without you.

     And in case you were wondering, the cake was tres leches and, I hate to admit it, store bought. Sorry, but this has been one crazy, busy week and I just didn’t have the time or energy to whip something up myself. Forgive me?

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Hatch Chile Pork Stew

Hatch Pork Chile Stew
Hatch Pork Chile Stew

     We did Hatch Chile Salsa and Hatch Chile Lime Wings which were sort of out of the box, so I decided that I would try something a little more traditional for my third cook involving these chilies. What’s more traditional than green-chile pork? No really…that wasn’t a rhetorical question. I’m really looking for answers. I’ve been to New Mexico a time or two, but in all honesty, I can’t seem to recall if I’ve had green-chile pork. I assume I must have, but I’ve got no memory of it, so if this varies from traditional, I apologize in advance, but I am NOT going to apologize for how tasty this turned out.

Roasting the Hatch Chiles
Roasting the Hatch Chiles

Ingredients

  • 3 lbs pork shoulder, majority of fat trimmed and cubed into 1″ pieces
  • 10 Hatch Chilies (we used 5 mild and 5 hot, adjust to your tastes)
  • 3 Serrano peppers
  • 1.5 lbs tomatillos, husk removed
  • 2 yellow onions, diced
  • 5 to 6 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 bunch of cilantro
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp oregano (Mexican if you can find it)
  • canola or vegetable oil
  • Optional garnishes: sour cream, cheese, limes, cilantro, tortilla strips and tortillas
Browning the pork
Browning the pork

Directions

Roasting the Hatch Chilies and Serranos

  1. Preheat your grill (or broiler) to 500F
  2. Roast Hatch chilies and serrano peppers until blackened on all sides (10-15 minutes)
  3. Remove peppers from the grill and place in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow to cool. This process with help steam the peppers and make peeling the skins off easier.
  4. Once the chilies have cooled enough to handle, remove the skins, cut off the stems, slice open and lay flat. Using a knife, scrape out the seeds and veins and discard. Dice the chilies and set aside.
  5. For the serranos, do not bother to remove the skins, but cut off the stem and remove the veins and seeds. Roughly chop and add to a food processor
Sauteeing the onions
sauteing the onions

Making the Stew

  1. Bring one quart of water and one bouillon cube to boil.
  2. Remove the husks from the tomatillos.
  3. Add the tomatillos and boil for 5 minutes or until tender.
  4. Drain the tomatillos, reserving 1.5 cups of the water. Add tomatillos to the food processor, along with the reserved water, the Serrano peppers and the leaves from one bunch of cilantro, discarding stems (reserving some of the cilantro for garnish)
  5. Pulse the mixture until your desired consistency is met. Set aside for later.
  6. Season the cubed pork shoulder with salt and pepper.
  7. Heat a large dutch oven on medium high and add a thin layer of canola or vegetable oil until almost smoking.
  8. Add a small batch of the pork and sear for a few minutes to brown. Stir and sear on all sides. Remove and continue until all the pork has been browned.
  9. Add the diced onions and cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add in the minced garlic and cook 2 more minutes or until the onions are tender.
  10. Return the pork to the dutch oven as well as the diced chilies and the pureed mixture. Bring to a boil.
  11. From here, you have three options, the way I see it.  A) Take your dutch oven and place it on your smoker or grill at 350 and allow to cook. This will infuse a small amount of smoke to your stew. If using a Kamado style grill, you want to cook it indirectly. You can use a place setter legs up and then set the dutch oven on top of spacers on top of the pate setter. If you have an Adjustable Rig from the Ceramic Grill store, place it on your Egg with the ceramic stone on the bottom level and then set the dutch oven on top of spacers on top the stone (this was the method I used) or B) You could place it in your oven at 350 or C) you could reduce the heat on your stove to a simmer.
  12. Every recipe I read, varied on how long to allow the stew to simmer. Anywhere from 20 minutes (that one used pork loin, not shoulder) to an hour and all the way up to three hours. I say cook it until the pork is tender. I think an hour would probably have been fine. I let mine simmer for an hour and forty minutes. Keep an eye on the liquid. If it appears to be drying out, add more water or chicken broth or even some Mexican beer if you have some on hand.
  13. When ready, garnish with cilantro and serve with slices of lime, sour cream, tortilla strips and/or tortillas.
Everybody into the pool!
Everybody into the pool!

     You maybe wondering why I wasn’t very specific on how long it took to simmer. Honestly, Mrs. G went out of town this weekend and I was waiting on her to get home. So I just let it continue to simmer.  It was probably ready to eat after an hour, but the longer it was on the Egg, the more the flavors would meld and it would absorb some of the mesquite smoke from the wood chunks I added. Just one more added dimension of flavor for this stew.

Onto the Egg at 350 with mesquite chips for smoke
Onto the Egg at 350 with mesquite chips for smoke

     Not to mention, it was a wonderful evening to sit outside. The weather was not too hot. Perfect for sipping on a cold beverage and watching the dogs protect our yard from those pesky squirrels.

Hatch Chile Pork Stew with a cold Negra Modelo
Hatch Chile Pork Stew with an ice cold beer

     While the stew is simmering along, if you’ve got the energy and some corn tortillas lying around, cut them into strips and quickly fry them up. They make a great accompaniment to the stew. And if you need help choosing a beverage, might I suggest an ice cold Negra Modelo? It pairs well with this spiciness of this dish. I recommend you drink it out of a glass and not in the bottle.

Garnish with cheese, sour cream, cilantro, lime and tortilla strips if desired
Garnish with cheese, sour cream, cilantro, lime and tortilla strips if desired

     Of the three dishes I have now prepared with Hatch Chilies, I’ve got to say that this is my favorite. Or the wings. Let’s call it a tie, but if you are looking for what I imagine to be a more traditional use, then this is the one you want. The pork was extremely tender and the stew was bursting full of flavors from the  chilies and peppers and tomatillos. I thought it had a nice level of heat to it, but let me tell you that the next day when I had some for leftovers, it had really ramped up. That’s not a problem for me, but I don’t know how you tolerate heat. Just beware that it gets hotter the longer it sits. I think Mrs. G would have been happier had I left out one or two of the serranos.

     As far as traditional goes, I don’t know if it was or was not. I saw a bunch of recipes that included things like potatoes, tomatoes, corn and/or hominy, among other things. I tried to keep it simple in order to let the flavor of the chilies stand out and I think that I accomplished that with this recipe. But hey…feel free to add whatever other ingredients your heart so desires. I’m fine with that.

     One of the employees said that they are winding down Hatch Chile season. Tomorrow will be the last day, so this will probably be my last Hatch Chile post for a while. I did buy about three pounds yesterday, and I’ll roast them today, clean them and freeze them to use throughout the year, but I’ll be moving on to other things…unless I have one more in me. We’ll just have to wait and see. 😉

Hatch Chile Lime Wings

Hatch Chili Lime Wings
Hatch Chili Lime Wings

Since the season for Hatch Chilies is so short, I thought I’d take advantage of it and see how many ways I could use them. If you’ve been following this blog or know me, then you probably figured I’d find a way to incorporate them into wings. What can I say? They are my 5th food group as Mrs. G jokingly refers to them.

Roasting some peppers on the Mini Big Green Egg
Roasting some peppers on the Mini Big Green Egg

Still being a newbie to Hatch Chilies, I thought I’d start off doing a search on the internet for wing recipes. I was kind of shocked that I was not able to find one, maybe you are a better searcher than me, but darned if I wasn’t able to stumble along anything. I did find a recipe that used green chilies, so I thought I would use that as a base and develop my own.

Ingredients

  • 5 Hatch Chilies (I suppose you could use Anaheim if Hatch isn’t available)
  • 2 jalapenos
  • 3/4 cup of freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 2 Tbsp paprika
  • 1 Tbsp McCormick’s Grill Mates Lemon Pepper with Herbs
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 1Tbsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2.5 lbs chicken wings
Grill the wings at 400F using a raised direct method if using a Kamado style grill
Grill the wings at 400F using a raised direct method if using a Kamado style grill

Directions

  1. Preheat your grill (or broiler) to 500F
  2. Roast Hatch chilies and jalapeno peppers until blackened on all sides (10-15 minutes)
  3. Remove peppers from the grill and place in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow to cool. This process with help steam the peppers and make peeling the skins off easier.
  4. While waiting for the peppers to cool, add the rest of the ingredients (minus the chicken) to a food processor or blender.
  5. Once the peppers have cooled enough to handle, remove the skins and cut off the stems. Slice open the peppers, lay flat and using a knife scrape out the seeds and veins and discard (you can reserve some of the seeds if you prefer hotter wings).
  6. Add the peppers to the food processor and puree. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.
  7. Place the chicken wings in a gallon zip lock bag and add the marinade. I like to put the bag in a bowl or casserole dish in case there are any leaks. Put the chicken in the refrigerator and allow to marinate for 2-8 hours.
  8. Preheat your grill to 400F. If using a Kamado style grill (like the BGE) set it up for a raised direct cook. For other grills, set up a two zone fire, one hot and one warm.
  9. Remove the wings from the marinade reserving the marinade. Bring the marinade to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for at least 10 minutes.
  10. Grill the wings for about 30 minutes, flipping and basting with the marinade every five minutes. If using a grill other than a Kamado style grill, you may need to shuffle the wings around to avoid flare ups or burning. Chicken is done when it reaches 165F, but I generally take mine to about 175. It allows more of the fat to melt off.
Time to eat
Time to eat

I was quite surprised by these wings. At first, you get a strong taste of lime, followed by an earthy flavor from the peppers along with a touch of smoke from cooking over lump charcoal. Finally, a slight burn on the lips begins to develop after eating two or three. Not too much, just enough to remind you of the Hatch Chilies and jalapeno peppers that were in the marinade. I never did get much of a mouth burn, however, which sort of surprised me. I thought the addition of the jalapeno peppers would have made it hotter.

I would have to say that these are probably some of the most unique wings I’ve ever had due to the addition of the fresh squeezed lime juice. Heat and citrus, who would’ve thunk it? Definitely a top five for me in the wing category. Once Hatch Chile season is gone, I’ll have to try them with Anaheim peppers and see if they work. I really hope I don’t have to wait until next year when Hatch Chiles come back.

Since Mrs. G was out of town, this was a sit in front of the TV kinda meal. Poor Olie didn't get any.
Since Mrs. G was out of town, this was a sit in front of the TV kinda meal. Poor Olie didn’t get any.

Hatch Chile Salsa

Hatch Chile Salsa
Hatch Chile Salsa

     It’s that time of year again. Hatch Chiles have begun arriving in stores. At least, here in Dallas they have started popping up. If you don’t know if stores in your area have them, try checking out Central Market or Whole Foods to start out with. Central Market goes crazy with them. You can find everything from tamales to crab cakes to sausage to hamburgers made with them. They put them in tortillas and marinades and dips and queso. You can even pick up some Hatch Chile Chocolate gelato (which I was a little disappointed in. I thought it would pack a bit more heat). If Central Market makes it, I can almost guarantee they have a version with Hatch in it right now.

Cast of characters for my salsa
Cast of characters for my salsa

     I’m not a big Hatch Chile snob. In fact, I’ve never cooked with them before. What little I do know about them boils down to this: Hatch Chiles are to the chile world what champagne is to sparkling wine. Let me explain a bit. All champagne is sparkling wine, but not all sparkling wine is champagne.You can make sparkling wine anywhere, but for it to be called champagne, it must be from Champagne, France. Same with these peppers. For them to be called Hatch Chiles, they must be grown in Hatch, New Mexico. Anywhere else, and they just aren’t Hatch Chiles. If they are grown in nearby Mesilla, then they are Mesilla chiles. Anaheim peppers? Taken from Hatch chile seeds and grown in Anaheim, Ca.

     So what’s the big deal about the Hatch valley? Some say its the volcanic soil. Some say its the climate, the hot days and cool nights. Does it really matter that much? I’m not sure, to me it sounds like one helluva marketing ploy. So why bother with them? Mrs. G loves Hatch chiles and quite honestly, I just got curious about them this year. I wanted to see what all the fuss was about. And at $0.99 a lb, why not?

Roasting my veggies for the salsa
Roasting my veggies for the salsa

     For my first use of Hatch chiles, I figured I’d start out with a simple salsa to get the feel…uh…I mean taste for them. I’ve made plenty of salsas before by charring the veggies on the grill first. I thought this would give me an understanding of the taste and heat of the chiles I was dealing with before I moved on to more complex dishes.

Ingredients

  • 3 Hatch Chiles (hot variety)
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 large onion, quartered
  • 4 cloves of garlic (unpeeled)
  • 1-2 limes, cut in half
  • 3 tbsp cilantro, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
Ingredients for salsa charred up
Ingredients for salsa charred up

Directions

  1. Setup your grill for a direct cook and preheat to 500F (or set your oven to broil)
  2. Roast the first five ingredients for 2-3 minutes, flip and continue the process until the vegetables are charred on all sides, roughly ten to fifteen minutes. For the limes, grill cut side down for 2-3 minutes if desired.
  3. Remove veggies from grill. Place chiles in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap.
  4. Remove the outer skin from the tomatoes, onions and garlic and toss in a food processor, as well as the cilantro. Squeeze the juice from one lime over the veggies.
  5. Once the chiles have cooled, remove the outer skin (it should peel right off). Cut off the stem end of the chiles and slice open one side. Open the chiles up so that they are laying flat and scrape out the veins and the seed (reserving the seeds if you like your salsa extra spicy). Toss the chiles into the food processor.
  6. Give the food processor a couple of quick pulses until it has reached your desired consistency.
  7. Taste and adjust seasonings by adding salt and pepper and/or more lime juice or cilantro. If it’s not spicy enough, add in some of the reserved seeds.
  8. The salsa can be eaten warm, or chilled. The longer it sits, the more the flavors will marry and develop.
Hatch Chile Salsa ready to eat
Hatch Chile Salsa ready to eat

     You may have noticed that the recipe calls for 3 Hatch Chiles and yet the pictures show I roasted 5. What’s up with that? I wasn’t quite sure what kind of punch these chiles would pack. This is our basic recipe for salsa, but we usually use jalapenos or whatever other peppers we have on hand. Never having used Hatch Chiles, I had no idea how many it would take, so I erred on the side of caution and went ahead and roasted extra. Better to have too many than not enough (not to mention my research has indicated that the chiles freeze better if they are already roasted).

Hatch Chile Salsa served up with tortilla chips
Hatch Chile Salsa served up with tortilla chips

     So was it worth it? Is the hype and fuss all blown out of proportion? I’m still on the fence about that one. The salsa was chocked full of flavors and had a nice complexity. I’m a big fan of charring the veggies for my salsa, always have been. It adds another dimension of flavor, a nice underlying smokey taste, but not to strong to overwhelm the other flavors. The Hatch chiles, while not super hot, offered up a new and distinctive heat than what I am used to. It produced a burn in a different part of my mouth than say a jalapeno. There was no back of the throat burn, more of a front of the tongue. It was nowhere near as hot as a jalapeno either, nor did the heat linger around half as long. It was there, and then it was gone. It was actually quite nice. I think Hatch Chiles would make a nice substitute for those who like milder salsas.

     To evaluate the taste and heat of the Hatch Chiles, I’m not sure salsa was the best idea. With so many other flavors for it to compete with, I guess its kind of hard to pick out and isolate that one flavor by itself. But that is OK, because this was a great salsa by itself, as well as with the tacos we had that didn’t get pictured. It would be great on eggs or breakfast tacos or anything else you like to put salsa on.

     And as for the Hatch Chile…well I’ve already got an idea for dinner Friday night using it in a marinade and a sauce and there is still plenty of time to take advantage of them before the season is over. I wonder if I should stockpile some? Roast them and freeze them to use throughout the year? Hmmm…the gears are moving…

     So are you a Hatch Chile fanatic? Do you go crazy over them in August? Do you roast them and stockpile them for the rest of the year? What’s your favorite Hatch Chile recipes? I’d love to hear about them.

Super Chicken Shit: A Seasoning Review

A beam of light shining down from heaven on my chicken (no, this picture was not "doctored" in any way)
A beam of light shining down from heaven on my chicken (no, this picture was not “doctored” in any way)

     You may have figured out that Mrs. G sometimes goes out of town for work. She’s got two busy seasons, one in January and one at the end of July/beginning of August. In simplest terms, she goes to “shows” to sell her companies products to stores. One of the cool things is she gets to see a lot of merchandise before they ever hit the shelves, next season’s newest stuff. Sometimes, she gets free samples. And sometimes, companies don’t want to rebox their stuff and ship it back home, so they sell it right there on the last few days. The last show she did was in Las Vegas, and yes, I went with her for a few days to “help her out”. Hence, the lack of recent posts. Anyway, her showroom shared a floor with a gourmet/food section. It was pretty cool to be able to walk around and check it out some of the new things that are coming to market, rubs, spices, dips, salsas, etc.

Super Shit
Super Shit!!

     I didn’t stay for the whole show, I was there for four and a half days and poor Mrs. G had to suffer through nine days. If you’ve been to Vegas (and done it right), you know that three is about as much as you need. Can you imagine nine? When she did get home, she said she had some goodies for me in her suitcase. Among other things, she had three bottles of Super Shit. Just on the name alone, I knew I was going to have to write a post about it. How could I not? My inner child was giddy and laughing, and I told a few jokes while cooking which after the first couple just earned me a bunch of eye rolls. Come on…you would have done the same. Admit it.

The chicken has been liberally dusted with Super Chicken Shit
The chicken has been liberally dusted with Super Chicken Shit

     You’ve seen us grill chicken plenty of times on the Egg, nothing new here. This post is mainly about the rub Super Chicken Shit. Just in case you haven’t, this is our preferred setup for grilling chicken. We like to get the Egg stabilized at 400F and use the Adjustable Rig from the Ceramic Grill store with the grate sitting on the top level. This raises the food above the felt line of the bottom dome. Not really direct cooking, not really indirect cooking, but more of a raised direct cook. If you want, you can add some wood chips or chunks, but when trying a rub for the first time, I usually do without. I don’t want the smoke to mask or cover up the flavor. I want to experience it as purely as I can so I can form an opinion on the rub just by itself, so this night we did without.

Chicken quarters on the Egg
Chicken quarters on the Egg

     The benefit of this setup is that you don’t have to worry about flare ups from the grease dripping down on to the lump charcoal and you don’t have to constantly flip or more your chicken around. If you are bored or have guests over and want to make it look like you are really working, you can shuffle your chicken around and flip it every 15 minutes or so. Me? This time of year with temperatures over 100F? I throw it on there and go back inside and watch TV. Maybe halfway through the cook I’ll go and check on it. Flip it if necessary, then go back inside and cool off.

Almost done
Almost done

     This set up is great for leg quarters, thighs and even whole chickens. It generally takes about 45 minutes to an hour. While I like to cook my chicken breasts to 160 and then pull them and let the residual heat carry them over to 165 so they don’t dry out, I find that legs and thighs can take more heat and actually benefit from it. Gives it a chance for the fat to melt off and the skin to get really crispy. I generally take them to 175F on the low-end and sometimes up to 180F. And no, they do not dry out. Still plenty juicy.

Finished
Finished

     With the name Super Chicken Shit, I really had high hopes. Just picture it. You’re sitting around with your buddies, enjoying a cold beverage and they ask you what you put on the chicken. Super Chicken Shit. You know you’ll get some laughs and entertainment out of that.

     So I’m sitting here typing this out. I got the bottle of Shit in front of me, trying to think of what to say about it. The ingredients say it has granulated onion, pepper, salt, chopped onion, hungarian paprika, granulated garlic, sugar, parsley, basil, fennel and other natural flavors (as well as up to 2% tri calcium phosphate as an anti-caking agent).  You can clearly see fresh parsley, basil and fennel in it. That’s what struck me first in appearance. That and its very pale, it doesn’t have much red to it like most BBQ rubs, but then again, it never claims to be a BBQ rub, just chicken seasoning. You open it up and you can see the chopped onion in it and smell the fennel. A dab on the finger tastes good and is promising, this could be good stuff.

     Sadly, I was proven wrong and disappointed. Maybe if the seasoning was used on chicken cooked in the oven, it would have been better. Cooking over lump charcoal, the flavors and spices just got lost. It was bland and underwhelming. The herbs didn’t stand out, we couldn’t detect the paprika or the garlic. That being said, the chicken didn’t need any extra salt or pepper. Overall, it just felt weak and underpowered.  I didn’t add any BBQ sauce during the cook or after the cook as I wanted to get the full flavor of the seasoning. That being said, after having a few bites to test the flavors, I pulled a bottle of our stand by BBQ sauce, Stubbs, out of the fridge and poured a bit on my plate to dip the chicken into. I wasn’t going to eat bland chicken just because the seasoning couldn’t hold its own. Maybe I’ll try it on something cooked inside without fire, but it won’t be going on any of my chicken that is destined for the Egg. I’ve got a pantry full of other rubs and seasonings that are way better.