Bacon Wrapped Dove Breast

     I was rooting around in the freezer the other day, looking for something to cook when I came across some dove that I had shot last year. I had totally forgotten about these little beauties. How that happened, I have no clue, but I was super excited.

     If you are a hunter, or live with somebody who hunts, this method of preparation is probably familiar to you. I thought I would share it with you, my readers, anyway. If you ever get ahold of any dove, I highly recommend it. Or you could use chicken instead. I think chicken breasts would work well, but chicken tenders would be even better.

Bqacon Wrapped Dove Breast and Jalapeno Cheese Venison Sausage

Bacon Wrapped Dove Breast and Jalapeno Cheese Venison Sausage

          Prep is really easy. Unfortunately, I didn’t get any pictures of that process to share with you, but I’m sure you can figure it out. All you need is your protein (be it dove or chicken), a few jalapenos, some cheddar cheese (or Monterrey jack or whatever cheese you feel like) and bacon. Home made bacon if you got it, but store bought will work just as well. Get the thinly sliced bacon, not the thick stuff. That takes longer to cook and your protein will end up drying out, which is no bueno.

     Slice your jalapenos in half and de-vein and de-seed them. Then, slice the jalapenos into strips. Lay one strip of jalapeno on your protein.

     Next, slice your cheese into sticks about the same size as your jalapenos. Lay the cheese next to the jalapeno on top of your protein.

     Take a slice of bacon and cut it in half and then wrap your dove, jalapeno and cheese with the bacon. Use toothpicks if needed to hold the bacon in place. Try to make sure that the cheese is covered on both ends to prevent it from leaking out as it cook. Don’t worry if it’s not perfect, some cheese will end up leaking out no matter how well you wrap it. 

     Finally, sprinkle on some of your favorite rub on the bacon wrapped dove.

Finished with a little asparagus

Finished with a little asparagus

               To cook, grill the bacon wrapped dove indirectly at 350-400F until the bacon is crispy. On the BGE, I used the Adjustable Rig with the ceramic stone on the bottom level and the grate at the top level. If you do not have an AR, use the plate setter, legs up, with the grate on top. For a gas grill, light half the burners and then place the dove on the unlit site. For a charcoal grill, bank your charcoal on one side of the grill and place the dove on the other side. Cooking times will vary depending on your grill and temperatures, but for me it took about 30 minutes.

All plated up and ready to eat!

All plated up and ready to eat!

     This turned out to be a pretty tasty meal. Even tastier knowing that I had shot the dove. And the venison in the sausage. And made the bacon myself. I didn’t grow the asparagus, but then who grows their own asparagus?

      If you happen to have a bunch of dove and don’t know what to do with it, or you are looking for something else to do with chicken, try out this method. Highly recommended at our house and ranch.

Some Food Porn Pictures

We’ve been busy lately. No excuse for it. Haven’t had much time to work on recipes or post up new stuff and we’ve just been doing old things around here, but I thought I’d share some pictures anyway today. One thing we have been doing is homebrewing. This picture was a few weeks ago when we brewed up an Irish Red. Due to rain and cold weather, we had to brew in the garage.  

Brewing an Irish Red

Brewing an Irish Red

While we were working on the brew, we also had two rack of spare ribs going.

Spare ribs on the Egg

Spare ribs on the Egg

Sometimes you just get a craving for a good burger. These ones were 80/20 ground rib eye. If you can get ground rib eye rather than chuck, I’d suggest trying it.

Ground rib eye burger and ABTs

Ground rib eye burger and ABTs

We recently found thinly sliced brisket at a nearby Asian store. Picked it up not being sure what we were going to do with it. How about using it for ABTs instead of bacon?

Brisket wrapped ABTs

Brisket wrapped ABTs

In an effort to eat better, we pulled the wok out and did some stir fry on the Egg.

Shrimp stir fry

Shrimp stir fry

And how can you resist some leg quarters? Half rubbed with John Henry’s Texas Chicken Tickler and half with Salt Lick Rub.

Chicken leg quarters cooking indirect.

Chicken leg quarters cooking indirect.

Brush ‘em with a little Lauren’s Spicy Sauce from Salt Lick and add some home made venison jalapeno cheese sausage.

Almost done.

Almost done.

Served up with some sautéed ‘shrooms and some kale. Um, Um good.

Dinner is served

Dinner is served

I’ll try and work on and finish up some new recipes this weekend to share with you this week. Unless March Madness ends up taking too much of my time. Sorry for the lack of new recipes lately. Hope this food porn will hold you over till then. Thanks for benig patient with us.

Blackened Red Snapper

Blackened Red Snapper

Blackened Red Snapper

Dizzy Pig is back at it again adding to  their “-ish” rubs with the new release Bayouish. Once again, they’ve sent me a sample before they release it to try out. I honestly don’t know why they choose to include me on their little list of people who get to sample it first, but I am glad they did.

Dizzy Pig's new Bayouish

Dizzy Pig’s new Bayouish

Along with a small sample, they sent a little note.

Note

Note

Enough of all that. Time to get cooking.

Ingredients

  • about a pound of fish fillets, red snapper, red fish, catfish or trout (or even chicken or steak)
  • 1 stick of unsalted butter, melted
  • Dizzy Pig’s Bayouish Seasoning (or other blackened seasoning)
  • lemon wedges for garnish (optional)
Snapper going into a screaming hot cast iron skillet on the grill

Snapper going into a screaming hot cast iron skillet on the grill

Directions

  1. Preheat your grill to hot. We had the Big Green Egg going steady at 650F. Allow your cast iron skillet to come up to heat with your grill.
  2. Brush both sides of your fish with melted butter and apply Bayouish liberally. Reserve remaining butter.
  3. After allowing your skillet to get “screaming” hot, carefully pour in a tbsp or so of butter and put the fish flesh side down.
  4. After two minutes, flip the fish and pour in another tbsp of butter and drizzle some on top of the fish. Cook for another two minutes or until fish is about 130F.
  5. Remove fish from skillet, squeeze lemon juice on top and enjoy.
Look at all that smoke!!

Look at all that smoke!!

Now why would you want to blacken your fish outside? Couldn’t you just do it inside? Check that above pic. See all that smoke? Can you imagine how smoky your house would be after that? This dish is better prepared outside so you don’t smoke out all your family, friends and/or pets.

Fresh off the gril...er...I mean cast iron skillet.

Fresh off the grill…er…I mean cast iron skillet.

     Sometimes, I don’t know what I would do without Mrs. G. She found a recipe somewhere and whipped up some dirty rice to go along with the fish. Not sure what all went into it except hot breakfast sausage, chicken livers (we had some left over from the risotto), celery and rice. Whatever it was, it was tasty.

Plated up and ready to eat.

Plated up and ready to eat.

     The red snapper was pretty darn tasty and I can see us using Dizzy Pig’s Bayouish often once they officially release it. It had a nice flavor and didn’t overpower the fish at all. If anything, Mrs. G and I both wish it had a bit more spice to it. I understand when marketing to the masses, you have to please a wide range of palettes, but the heat was just lacking in our humble opinions. Nothing a little hot sauce won’t fix. Or mixing in a little cayenne to the rub. Otherwise, the flavors were pretty well balanced. If you like really spicy food, this might not be the rub for you, but if you are addicted to blackened fish, you should give it a try.

Herb and Garlic Lamb Loin Chops

     

Lamb Chops with a Winter Mushroom Risotto

Lamb Chops with a Winter Mushroom Risotto

     The other week a member on the Egghead Forum who goes by the handle R2Egg2Q posted up a picture of some lamb chops that he had cooked and they looked amazing. I don’t have much experience cooking lamb. I suppose it might be partly that I did not grow up eating it. And partly because of the price tag, I’ve been afraid of messing it up. R2Egg2Q’s lamb looked so good, though, and everybody said it cooks up just like a small steak, so I figured I’d give it a shot using his recipe.

Lamb loin chops marinating.

Lamb loin chops marinating.

     Don’t those look pretty? I picked them up at Central Market and they were about 2 -2.5″ thick. Not being a lamb expert, I wasn’t sure how many to get and erred on the safe side by getting six (which turns out to be way too many for 2 people BTW). Total cost came out to about $33. Gee…I hope I don’t screw this one up.

Herb and Garlic Lamb Loin Chops

Ingredients

  • 6 lamb loin chops
  • 1 Tbsp thyme , chopped fine
  • 1 Tbsp oregano, chopped fine
  • 1 Tbsp rosemary, chopped fine
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 cup EVOO
  • optional – Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express or other coffee flavored bbq rub
Onto the Mini Big Green Egg at 450F

Onto the Mini Big Green Egg at 450F, just barely fit.

Directions

  1. Mix the herbs, garlic, lemon zest, salt and pepper and EVOO together in a small bowl.
  2. Place the lamb chops in a dish just large enough to hold them. Brush the marinade on both sides and allow to sit for at least 2 hours.
  3. Set up your grill for a direct cook and preheat to 450F.
  4. Lightly dust the lamb chops with Red Eye Express (or other coffee flavored BBQ rub) on one side. Place dusted side face down on grill and lightly dust the other side.
  5. Grill 4-5 minutes per side or until internal temp reaches 130-135.
  6. Remove from grill, loosely tent with foil and allow 10 minutes to rest before serving.
Getting happy on the grill

Getting happy on the grill

     I really don’t know why I was worried. If you think about it, they are just like really, really tiny t-bones or porterhouse steaks. Or even pork loin chops. Same part of the animal, just smaller.

Finished

Finished

     Mrs. G whipped up the Winter Mushroom Risotto that can be found in the February 20014 issue of Southern Living. Not a real hard recipe, but it is time consuming as it takes constant stirring for 30-35 minutes.

All plated up.

All plated up.

     The lamb loin chops were divine. Herbaceous, if you will with just the right notes of citrus in the background and a hint of the coffee flavored rub. This will be my go-to recipe for lamb chops from now on. The lamb really paired well with the risotto, too. It was a perfect Valentine’s Dinner. Oh? Did I not mention that? Yes, this was how we celebrated Valentine’s Day rather than face the mad hordes that descended on all the restaurants last Friday. Who needs that hassle? We just took it easy, had a nice meal at home and then…

Enjoying quality time around the fire.

Enjoyed some quality time around the fire.

     What I would do differently? Not much. I think the only thing I would change would be to cook them on a bigger grill. Cooking them on the Mini was just pushing it. Really crowded grate and they were hard to flip and maneuver. That much meat really drops the temp of the grill as well. Yeah, I’d definitely do them on the Large next time and that’s about the only change I would make.

     I think I have conquered my fear of lamb. It’s just another hunk o’ meat, although a little more expensive than beef. But if you treat it just like any other steak and monitor the internal temp, you will be fine.  No need to worry at all. Next, I want to tackle a rack of lamb…

WHY NOT??

Old Skool Millet Lite Can

Old School Millet Lite Can

     The other day, the weather was beautiful here in the DFW. I figured I’d sit on the patio  with the dogs and enjoy the weather with a cold one. But what beer to get? The limited time old school can of Millet Lite caught my eye. Does the beer taste any different? Nah, but it does have nostalgia. WHY NOT??

Over the Top Burger

Over the Top Burger

A burger sounded good after a few beers. I’ve been losing some weight so I can afford it. Two quarter pound patties, Chihuahua cheese and two thick slices of bacon. Healthy? No! Tasty? Yes! WHY NOT??

P.S. I didn’t eat it all and I do plan on taking the dogs for a walk today after work. ;)

Herbed Trout Fillets

Herbed Trout Fillets

Herbed Trout Fillets

     Back to the other day when I was wandering around aimlessly shopping at Sprouts and I spotted that beautiful okra. I needed something to go with the fried okra that I thought I was going to make. Fish is always a healthy choice and I figured I would make some blackened salmon or maybe catfish. When I got to the fish counter, the trout jumped out at me. It looked fresher and while a bit more than the catfish, it was cheaper than the salmon. Plus we like trout.

     My original thought was to do our Grilled Blackened Trout. We don’t like to do the traditional method of blackening inside our house. It get the house smokey, which in turn sets off the smoke alarm, which then freaks our dogs out causing them to either start barking or go into hiding. Not to mention makes the house smell. But with temperatures in the 20′s and me all nice and cozy in our warm house, lighting the Egg just did not seem to be in my future. So it was off to go scour the old interweb and see what kind of easy recipe I could find to go with our stewed okra and tomatoes. 

Herbed Trout Fillets 

Adapted from Emeril Lagasse’s Herbed Trout Fillets

Ingredients

  • 4 6-8 oz trout fillets
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp Creole seasoning (like Tony Chachere’s)
  • 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 Tbsp finely chopped parsley
  • 1 Tbsp finely chopped green onions (or chives)
  • 2 tsp oregano
  • 1/4 olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • lemon wedges as accompaniment

Directions

  1. Preheat broiler to 500F
  2. In a medium bowl, combine lemon juice, Creole seasoning, garlic, parsley, green onions and oregano. Slowly whisk in olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Line a cookie sheet with foil and then place a wire rack on top. Spray the wire rack with PAM. Arrange the fillets on top and then brush with vinaigrette.
  4. Broil 5-6 inches from heat until just cooked through, about 5 minutes or until temperature reaches 135F.
  5. Serve with lemon wedges.

Herbed trout fillets with stewed okra and tomatoes

Herbed trout fillets with stewed okra and tomatoes

     We really enjoyed this simple method for trout. Easy ingredients and total time from start to finish was under 10 minutes. By lifting the trout off the baking sheet and onto a wire rack, it allows the skin to crisp up a bit which is a plus in my book. And the trout paired really well with the stewed okra and tomatoes. I didn’t think that this recipe was going to be worthy of a post so I really didn’t work hard at the photos, but I was pleasantly surprised. I just wish I had taken better photos now. Oh well.

     And please, please if you are going to eat seafood, don’t reach for that bottle of tartar sauce. Do yourself a favor and quickly whisk up a batch. It really does make a difference and takes very little effort on your part. This is one we really enjoy: Home Made Horseradish and Tarragon Tartar Sauce

Stewed Okra and Tomatoes

Stewed okra and tomatoes

Stewed okra and tomatoes

     The other day I was walking through my local Sprouts and I spotted some beautiful okra sitting in a large barrel. For those that don’t have one in their area, Sprouts touts themselves as:

“Sprouts is a neighborhood grocery store with the feel of an old-fashioned farmers market. Our bright, friendly stores are filled with everyday staples and specialty items at a great value. You’ll find mountains of fresh fruits and vegetables, barrels of wholesome grains, nuts and sweets, full-service deli, meat and seafood counters—complete with homemade burgers and sausages. Roam around our spacious aisles and you’ll find fresh baked goods, eclectic beer and wine, gourmet cheese, sensibly-priced vitamins and supplements, and thousands of natural, organic and gluten-free groceries.”

It’s a great place to pick up fresh fruits and vegetables, grass fed beef and exotic meats such as bison, elk and others. And if you are into it, they have all kinds of health nut things. Vitamins and organic this and that and gluten free everything. Great stuff if you are into it, but I mainly go to get fresh fruits and veggies.

     Like I was saying, I spotted some beautiful okra and I grabbed it thinking only of making fried okra. Then I got to thinking that fried was probably not the healthiest choice I could make and instead decided stewed okra and tomatoes would be much healthier and I’m glad I did. I knew that Mrs. G liked it. What I didn’t know was that it is one of her favorite dishes. Score some extra bonus points for me. :)

Ingredients

  • 1 lb fresh okra, stems and tips removed and sliced (frozen is ok if that is all you can find)
  • 2 slices of thick bacon
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 bell pepper, diced (I used red as Sprouts did not have green and I don’t like green anyway)
  • 2 cloves of garlic, diced
  • 1 14.5 can diced tomatoes with juices (basil, garlic and oregano preferably)
  • 8 oz tomato sauce
  • 1 tsp creole seasoning, such as Tony Chachere’s
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • optional 1 tsp of sugar (to cut the acidity if desired)
After simmering for awhile

After simmering for a while

Directions

  1. In a large saute pan, cook the two slices of bacon. When done, remove bacon and set aside. Coarsely chop when cool.
  2. Sautee the onion and bell pepper over medium heat in the reserved bacon grease until tender (add extra oil if needed). Once tender, add the garlic and sautee for an additional minute of two, making sure not to brown the garlic.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients including the chopped bacon, turn the stove down to a low simmer and cover the pan. Cook for about 30 minutes or until okra has reached your preferred texture.

*Note – this dish is even better if made the day before or if allowed to set for a few hours after cooking to allow the flavors to develop and marry.

Plated up with a nice piece of fish and home made tartar sauce.

Plated up with a nice piece of fish and home made tartar sauce.

     Even though I was craving fried okra when I was at the store, I’m glad I went the healthier route. This dish is chock-full of flavors. A little tart, a little sweet, a little heat and just the right amount of acidity. It doesn’t look very pretty on a plate, but don’t let its looks fool you. Mrs. G declared the dish a winner, although she said I overcooked the bacon. She thinks I shouldn’t have gotten it as crispy as I did.

     As for the fish, we’ll get to that tomorrow. Or the next day. In the meantime, you can find the recipe for our home made Horseradish and Tarragon Tartar Sauce HERE. The only changes we’ve made is to use yellow onion instead of the red onion. The red onion tends to turn the sauce pink if allowed to sit to long.